Hourly Mood and Symptom Chart

Affect study for awareness

Pennsylvania Echoes

Mood charts and symptom charts are simple tools for tracking symptoms over along period of time. But many mood disorder managers may experience intrusive mood fluctuations or other symptoms (anxiety for example) in  shorter periods of time.
Mental Health  Consumers  diagnosed with  Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder, Personality Disorders, Post-Traumatic Disorder, for example, can experience fast changing moods, energy levels or anxiety. Mood can shift to extremes, multiple times a day,
In any case, rapid cycling of moods can be debilitating, making it difficult to function through ones daily life.

I thought it might be helpful to create a downloadable  chart for tracking  moods and symptoms  hourly, or over  intervals over a day. This mood chart is for those who are trying get a handle highly fluctuating moods.

Hourly mood and Symptom Chart

                    

So I made a simple chart for tracking mood and symptoms hour by hour if…

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Reification Definition

ЯR refication ЯR

Pennsylvania Echoes

News magazines… political advertisements…. bombastic web pages… shock jocks. It seems we are bombarded with a lot rhetoric these .  Rhetoric can be coercive.    To help sort facts from rhetoric its important to understand what refification is. Reificating is treating  concepts, hypothetical constructs and postulates as if they real, concrete or even organic, when writing, speaking, broadcasting or communicating.

Reification  is the act treating  an idea as if it were real.

* I prefer  to use  the word “reificating”  since it is a description of an action – and different from “reification” (the act of reificating) in noun form, is a concept or construct… so goes the nature of the English natures use of nouns. I think its appropriate to point out in here.
Some Examples of Reification:

 
“Evolution chooses the strong to survive.”
“Good and Evil forces control the fate of man.”
“Information wants to…

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Responses for Better Listening Skills

⚃ tenants to remember ⚃

Pennsylvania Echoes

Would you like to improve your listening and conversation skills?
Try working in a response or two starting with the following:

  • What I hear you saying is…
  • Sounds like….
  • You’re feeling….
  • You think…
  • From your perspective…..
  • What I’m hearing is that your saying...
  • It sounds like you value…
  • Could this be….
  • By that you mean…
  • It sounds like on one hand you feel_____ because you think______ and
    on the other hand you feel_______ because you think________.

Good listening is like data collecting. One lets go of bias and preconceptions, and refrain from making judgements and opinions. Responding, is clarifying and confirming  he/she is listening to what someone is saying to him.

To probe further into another is saying, try one of the following:

I’m wondering…
  • what you mean by…
  • what that means to you.
  • what have you thought of doing…
  • What have you tried before?
  • How do you…

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What is Holism

ὅλος ‾‾ ⍉⌾◯ Holism

Pennsylvania Echoes

blue-sea-of-you-and-me

Two ripples of a pond move along. One ripple bumps into another ripple and strikes up a conversation.
He asks :”Hey how big is this Pond? Can you see how fast are we moving in it?”
The other ripple replies: “I cant fully makes see it… You see: You, I and the pond, we and the pond… are actually part of one and another..

*

A ripple in the whole of a pond is always in a state of interaction with the pond.

A person observing and describing his environment is: always in a  active state,  where the two are influence one another.
The influences may be arbitrarily subtle to grand. But the interaction is always there.

If we are to observe a “person” in solely in a static form, or observe the Environment ignoring the person, we miss the the complex interaction between the two.
So in we treat…

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Mood definition… a disorderly description, Reposted

🤣🙄😬😠🤗😔😷🎭隉

Pennsylvania Echoes

Reposted
Mood definition … A Disorderly Discription by a Bipolar Disorder Manager..”
was origionally posted on 5-10-2009


You wake up one morning.

  • You feel happy,loving, humorous  optimistic.
  • Your confidence and self worth are high.
  • You are motivated.
  • Your body feels healthy and energetic
  • You are  thinking is clear, focused,  positive.
  • You are not concerned witht bad thoughts.
  • Your impulses are strong and up mind/body feel crisp.
  • You  look outside your window and everything appears crisp , bright and colorful.

You are  in a “good mood”or an up mood.

You don’t need all these attributes to be in a “good” or “up” mood, when you wake up. You may be happy and thinking positive, but not feeling energetic…. You might feel very energetic a little confident and optimistic  and not particularly impulsive.
However, these attributes are loosely tied together… or appear commonly together in feelings … and we describe…

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pot of wisdom quotes

智徳鬴

Pennsylvania Echoes

With the new year coming soon, I thought I would  reflect or meditate on some quotes of wisdom:

Zen is not some kind of excitement, but merely concentration on our usual everyday routine.
Shunkyu Suzuki

The quieter you become, the more you can hear.
Baba Ram Dass

We shape clay into a pot, but it is the emptiness inside that holds whatever we want.
Lao Tzu

zen quotes cited: {web page}

“The only real valuable thing is intuition.”
Albert Einstein ( page cited)

“Those who have no compassion have no wisdom. Knowledge, yes; cleverness, maybe; wisdom, no. A clever mind is not a heart. Knowledge doesn’t really care. Wisdom does.”
—from the Tao of Pooh (page cited)

may the new year be a pot filled only with wisdom!

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Induction, Deduction and Eight States of Change

þThis is my favorite post by Relationary —
Σ summary description of
Grief & Trauma ― stages & cycles.―

∴ relationary.wordpress.com ∵

relationary.wordpress.com

Elizabeth Kübler-Ross

For many years, people with terminal illnesses were an embarrassment for doctors. Someone who could not be cured was evidence of the doctors’ fallibility, and as a result the doctors regularly shunned the dying with the excuse that there was nothing more that could be done (and that there was plenty of other demand on the doctors’ time).

Elizabeth Kübler-Ross was a doctor in Switzerland who railed against this unkindness and spent a lot of time with dying people, both comforting and studying them. She wrote a book, called ‘On Death and Dying’ which included a cycle of emotional states that is often referred to (but not exclusively called) the Grief Cycle.

In the ensuing years, it was noticed that this emotional cycle was not exclusive just to the terminally ill, but also other people who were affected by bad news, such as losing their jobs…

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